COMMON COOKING TIMES


You are about to find out why Fagor Pressure Cookers are the single most important piece of cookware you'll ever own. You will find in the Fagor Pressure Cooker your new best friend in the kitchen, enabling you to prepare healthy, diverse meals in half the time!


Pressure-cooking is a method that utilizes steam under pressure. By sealing food and liquids in the cooker, the temperature can be brought up to 250º F (water boils at 215º F). The steam pressure breaks down the fibers in the food in a very short time. Foods become moist and succulent with an intense intermingling of flavors.


 

TRADITIONAL COOKING TIME (Minutes)

PRESSURE COOKING TIME (Minutes)

Broccoli

15

2

Chicken, Whole

60

20

Risotto

25

7

White Potatoes, Cubed

20

5

Black Beans

120

10

Soups

45

12

Lobster

10

3

White Rice

20

5

Brown Rice

40

20

Red Kidney Beans

120

20


Cooking Times for Vegetables
Cooking Times for Seafood
Cooking Times for Dried Beans & Grains
Cooking Times for Poultry & Meat


Cooking Times for Vegetables

Pressure-cooking is an excellent means of bringing out the best in fresh, frozen and dried vegetables. The short amount of time it takes to pressure cook vegetables helps maintain their natural flavor, nutritional value and vibrant color. Many vegetables can be pressure cooked in as little as one minute and usually no longer than five minutes.


Tips for Cooking Vegetables

  • Cook vegetables in a steamer basket, using ½ - 2-3 cup of water.
  • Add an additional 1-2 minutes to cooking time when using frozen vegetables.
  • Use the cold-water release method at the end of the cooking time so vegetables will remain crisp.

 

Approximate Cooking Time (Minutes)

Pressure Setting

Asparagus, thick whole

2

High

Asparagus, thin whole

1 - 1½

High

Beans, fava, shelled

4

High

Beans, green, whole

2 - 3

High

Beans, lima

2

High

Beets, small whole

1 - 2

High

Beets, large whole

20

High

Broccoli, chopped, florets or spears

2

High

Brussel sprouts, whole

4

High

Carrots, 1-inch chunks

4

High

Carrots, 1/4-inch slices

1

High

Cauliflower, florets

2 - 3

High

Corn, kernel

1

High

Corn on the cob

3

High

Escarole, coarsely chopped

1 - 2

High

Kale, coarsely chopped

1 - 2

High

Okra, small pods

2 - 3

High

Onions, medium whole

2 - 3

High

Peas

1

High

Potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes

5

High

Potatoes, new whole

5

High

Potatoes, sweet and yams, medium whole

10 - 11

High

Potatoes, sweet and yams, 2" chunks

6 - 7

High

Spinach, fresh, coarsely chopped

2

High

Squash, acorn, halved

7

High

Squash, butternut, 1-inch chunks

4

High

Squash, summer, zucchini or yellow, 1/2-inch slices

2

High

Turnips, small quartered

3

High

Turnips, 1 1/2 inch chunks

3

High

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Cooking Times for Seafood

Cooking fresh seafood in a pressure cooker leaves fish tender and moist. Whether served in a stew or alongside rice and vegetables, a seafood dish made in a pressure cooker is an excellent choice for a nutritious and easy to cook meal. Ideally fresh seafood should be cooked the day it is bought. If you are defrosting frozen fish, the best way is to place the fish in the bottom of your refrigerator for several hours or overnight.


Tips for Cooking Seafood

  • Cooking times may vary according to the kind of seafood being cooked.
  • Cook seafood in the steamer basket (also called cooking rack) with the trivet on the bottom of the pot. Lightly grease the steamer basket with vegetable oil when cooking fish.
  • Always use at least ¾ cup of liquid when cooking seafood.

 

Approximate Cooking Time (Minutes)

Pressure Setting

Clams

2 - 3

Low

Crabs

2 - 3

Low

Lobster, 1 1/2 - 2 lbs.

2 - 3

Low

Mussels

2 - 3

Low

Scallops

1 - 2

Low

Shrimp

1 - 2

Low

Fish, whole, gutted

5 - 6

Low

Fish, soup or stock

5 - 6

High

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Cooking Times for Dried Beans & Grains

Dried beans, legumes and grains have always played an important part in the Mediterranean diet, which is high in complex carbohydrates. One of the fastest ways to cook dried beans, legumes and grains is in a pressure cooker. What used to take hours to cook is now reduced to minutes. Several types of beans do not even need to be presoaked.


Tips for Cooking Beans & Legumes

  • Before cooking, soak beans in four times their volume of lukewarm water for at least four hours or overnight. If unable to soak beans beforehand, add 15 minutes to cooking time. Do not salt soaking water because it will toughen beans and inhibit hydration.
  • Do not soak dried split lentils.
  • Place beans or legumes in the pressure cooker. Add three cups of water for each cup of beans or legumes.
  • Add 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil for each cup of water to cut down on foaming during cooking. Do not add salt until after cooking.
  • Let pressure drop naturally after cooking.
  • Cooking times vary according to the quality of the beans or other legumes. If still hard after recommended cooking times, continue cooking uncovered.
  • Add additional water, if necessary.

Tips for Cooking Grains

  • Before cooking tough grains, soak in four times their volume of lukewarm water for at least four hours or overnight. If unable to soak grains beforehand, add 15 minutes to recommended cooking time. Do not add salt to water since it will toughen the grains and inhibit hydration.
  • Do not soak rice.
  • Rinse all grains under lukewarm water before cooking.

 

Approximate Cooking Time (Minutes)

Pressure Setting

Azuki

5 - 6

High

Black Beans

8 - 10

High

Black Eyed Peas

9 - 11

High

Chick Peas

10 - 12

High

Cranberry

8 - 10

High

Gandules (Pigeon Peas)

7 - 9

High

Great Northern

8 - 12

High

Kidney Beans

10 - 12

High

Lentils, green

8 - 10

High

Lentil, soup

8 - 10

High

Lentils, red

8 - 10

High

Lima beans

5 - 7

High

Navy or pea beans

10 - 12

High

Pinto beans

4 - 6

High

Rice, basmati, 1 1/2 cups

5 - 7

High

Rice, converted, 1 1/2 cups

5 - 7

High

Rice, long grain, 1 1/2 cups

5 - 7

High

Rice, wild, 3 cups

22 - 25

High

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Cooking Times for Poultry & Meat

When cooking red meats in a pressure cooker, there is no need to use expensive cuts of beef. Lesser quality cuts of meat work just as well, as they become tender and full of flavor in a pressure cooker. There are so many varieties of meals you can make with poultry that it’s no wonder why chicken is such a popular meat in the United States. Chicken and turkey can be pressure cooked in as little as six minutes, and when combined with vegetables, rice or potatoes, you can have a meal in less than 15 minutes- and all made in one pot.


Tips for Cooking Poultry & Meat

  • Always cook meat or poultry with at least ½ cup of liquid. If cooking time exceeds 15 minutes, use 2 cups of liquid. Preserved meats or salted meats should be completely immersed in cooking liquid.
  • Exact cooking times for meat and poultry vary according to the quality and quantity of the meat or poultry being cooked. The denser the cut of meat or poultry, the longer the cooking time should be.
  • Unless indicated, the cooking times given below are for 3 pounds of meat or poultry.

 

Approximate Cooking Time (Minutes)

Pressure Setting

Beef/Veal, roast or brisket

35 - 40

High

Beef, meatloaf

10 - 15

High

Beef, meatballs

5 - 10

High

Beef, corned

50 - 60

High

Pork, roast

40 - 45

High

Pork, ribs, 2 lbs.

15

High

Pork, ham shank

20 - 25

High

Lamb, leg of

35 - 40

High

Chicken, whole, 2-3 lbs.

12 - 15

High

Chicken, pieces, 2-3 lbs.

8 - 10

High

Cornish Hens, two

8 - 10

High

Meat or Poultry, soup or stock

10 - 15

High

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